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Scientific publication

Alternate Day Fasting Improves Physiological and Molecular Markers of Aging in Healthy, Non-obese Humans

Publication from Health
Bioanalytik und Metabolomics

Stekovic S, Hofer SJ, Tripolt N3 Aon MA, Royer P, Pein L, Stadler JT, Pendl T, Prietl B, Url J, Schroeder S, Tadic J, Eisenberg T, Magnes C, Stumpe M, Zuegner E, Bordag N, Riedl R, Schmidt A, Kolesnik E, Verheyen N, Springer A, Madl T, Sinner F, de Cabo R, Kroemer G, Obermayer-Pietsch B, Dengjel J, Sourij H, Pieber TR, Madeo F

Cell Metabolism , 8/2019

Abstract:

Caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are known to prolong life- and healthspan in model organisms, while their effects on humans are less well studied. In a randomized controlled trial study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02673515), we show that 4 weeks of strict alternate day fasting (ADF) improved markers of general health in healthy, middle-aged humans while causing a 37% calorie reduction on average. No adverse effects occurred even after >6 months. ADF improved cardiovascular markers, reduced fat mass (particularly the trunk fat), improving the fat-to-lean ratio, and increased β-hydroxybutyrate, even on non-fasting days. On fasting days, the pro-aging amino-acid methionine, among others, was periodically depleted, while polyunsaturated fatty acids were elevated. We found reduced levels sICAM-1 (an age-associated inflammatory marker), low-density lipoprotein, and the metabolic regulator triiodothyronine after long-term ADF. These results shed light on the physiological impact of ADF and supports its safety. ADF could eventually become a clinically relevant intervention.

Keywords: RCT; aging; body shape; caloric restriction; cardiovascular disease risk; clinical trial; fasting; fat distribution; intermittent fasting; triiodothyronine

Url: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31471173